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Thread: Glover's workbench

  1. #61
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    The GSWR/GSR built similar 14' cattle wagons that lasted into the late 1950s the main spotting difference was the GSWR/GSR wagons had different end detail and nearly flat sheet steel or iron roofs.

    The final MGWR convertible wagons built after WW1 were a soft topped version of the Irish Standard covered wagon produced by Provincial wagons rather than the traditional 14' round roofed convertible wagon http://www.studio-scale-models.com/img/k14.jpg
    Last edited by Mayner; 20-02-2017 at 10:10 AM.
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  2. #62
    I must say that I am delighted with the information which has been brought forward, especially by jhb and Mayner in responding to my scribblings. Thank you gentlemen.

    When Parkside released their kit for an LMS cattle van, I had a very close look at it. The fact that the diagonal bracing on the sides was a separate piece suggested that one problem would be eliminated. There was also the possibility of reducing the length by removing one panel either side of the door. This is the starting point (for once, I took a couple of photos while the project was in progress):Name:  image.jpg
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    This photo shows the major work required: remove one panel either side of the door and remodel the door itself.Name:  image.jpg
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    The floor/chassis also required shortening.Name:  image.jpg
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    The end result is as follows:Name:  image.jpg
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    I have slightly hidden the van on the right; somewhere along the way, I managed to get the wheelbase wrong! The bars over the upper body openings are a bit wonky: larger diameter wire the next time, I think.
    I have to say that this piece of kit bashing does show promise and, in the absence of a proper CIE KN, may be the only way forward.
    An excellent modeller of Scottish railways who goes by the name of Ben Alder on RMweb has modified a fleet of these. Obviously, less surgery is required but one idea he had was to use the internal partitions in some parts of his project.

    Glover

  3. #63
    I can't think that there was any particular need for horse boxes on the Bundoran branch; this part of the country is not exactly noted for breeding race horses, although a few show horses might have travelled to the Spring or horse show at the RDS in Dublin.
    Either way, others might have some interest in or use for this little project.
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    It's basically the old Lima horse box, reduced in length with new ends and roof, mounted on a Mainline chassis. The end result is I think a reasonable facsimile of the GSR/CIE horse box.

    I built it some years ago. If I decide to keep it, it needs a repaint and decals.

    Cheers,
    Glover

  4. #64
    Looking good, I like the conversion you did to the cattle wagon kit
    Nelson
    1̶5̶,̶1̶6̶,̶1̶7̶ 18 years old, and,
    Modelling the LNER, LMS NCC and UTA (steam of course)

  5. #65
    This hardly merits inclusion in a workbench thread but I'll include it as the background research might be of some use to others. It's the Provincial Wagons GNR flat with bread containers.Name:  image.jpg
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    Apart from some weathering and removing the brake shoes from the right hand side, it's the standard product.

    The GNR are reputed to have developed this as a new traffic post WW2, although the NCC also offered the service. The containers were loaded at the bakeries and brought to the GNR goods yards in Belfast and Derry for onward carriage on goods trains. They were then returned in the afternoon.
    Pre the Anglo-Irish Free Trade Agreement ( mid/late 1960s), bakeries in Northern Ireland could not sell their products in the Republic of Ireland and vice versa. It was protectionism.
    Therefore, while a bread container could be seen passing through Pettigo, it would have to be destined for a town in NI. The only town of any size after Pettigo was Belleek. The only photo I could find was a Brewsters' container in Belleek.
    Brewster were I believe a Derry/Londonderry bakery while Inglis were I think based in Belfast.
    On that basis, the Inglis container is probably inappropriate. I don't suppose we have any experts on the Northern Ireland bakery business on the forum........

    Regards,

    Glover

  6. #66
    love the galvenised covered shelter! that looks class sir!

  7. #67
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Glover, yours are some of the posts on this forum that I particularly look forward to!

    Inglis was indeed based in Belfast. For years, their standard batch loaf was marketed as "Mother's Pride" and for all I know may still be. Since I never liked white bread (I know, it's the gricer's staple diet, but I was always a bit odd), I used to refer to it as "Mother's Shame"......

    However, however;

    Inglis containers were certainly to be seen on the "Derry Road" and in the context of your layout being based about 1963 would have been very much part of the scene. Personally, I never heard of Brewsters, but someone from Derry-hi! or Donegal-hi! might be able to elaborate.

    I could be wrong, but I THINK I saw a picture once of an Inglis box at Killybegs in the goods yard. Whether it arrived by rail or by road is open to conjecture, but it was in the CDR goods yard.

    At Dunmurry, where the De Lorean factory was built, and nowadays all sorts of industrial units, this was previously a sports field. There's a 1963 picture of a dirty 171 with the Portadown-Belfast goods passing this spot in one of the colour album books, which shows this field in the background. Until the De Lorean fiasco* was built, two of those old Inglis containers sat at the side of the pitch in use as rusty dressing rooms, one presumably for each team. They were just shelters really, as the doors were off. So, as an aside, there's a modelling detail idea for someone with a northern-based layout (Nelson?) to have a small derelict hut in a corner somewhere made out of one of these!

    (* I just knew it from the start.)
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  8. #68
    Excellent post Glover. There is a picture of a Brewster's (Derry Bakery)container lying abandoned in Lisnaska Station 1967 in 'Fermanagh's Railways'

  9. #69
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirley View Post
    Excellent post Glover. There is a picture of a Brewster's (Derry Bakery)container lying abandoned in Lisnaska Station 1967 in 'Fermanagh's Railways'
    ....there ye go; thus, both versions are fine for your area and era.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

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