Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34

Thread: CIE 60s early 70s era goods wagons

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Junctionmad View Post
    I do mourn the current generation of young people who will have little or no variety to model, can't see the attraction in the post 2010 scene personally at all.
    Doesn't stop them re-imagining the past. I very much doubt many that indulge in say, WW2 military modelling were knocking around back then.

    The present scene doesn't inspire me either. Neatly demarked car parks, soulless modern buildings and structures made as ugly as possible with indiscriminate use of galvanised steel barriers and palisade fencing. Little or no activity between trains to speak of.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Junctionmad View Post
    From attending the odd club and exhibitions etc , I'd say the demographic that's now most prevalent seems to be 40+ , with minorities in the 60s. This is possibly due to the cost of railway modelling these days.

    I'm the same age as Noel , but I'd didn't start haunting railways till about 73 , and as I lived in the country and my dad was car mad , we rarely came in contact with railways before I started traveling on them myself. I do remember an early trip to Waterford good shed ( the new one ) when H vans etc were in common use. ( and watching the shunting ) , but in reality all my detailed recollections were from the start of the super train era and while the sidings were full of laid up vans , the main trains were block or unit trains.

    Personally , I prefer the immediate post Black and Tan period, the era of 1975+ freight modernisation very interesting , primarily because you had an explosion of interesting single purpose freight wagons . Equally that era began to be seriously chronicled by photographers an issue that bedevils previous eras in Irish railway history. My only regret was , that life pressures , meant I didnt run round the country in the late 90s , with my first digital camera , before all of it was destroyed from 2005 onwards.

    I do mourn the current generation of young people who will have little or no variety to model, can't see the attraction in the post 2010 scene personally at all.
    Yes we all have our own unique life experiences and memories to call on. As a youngster I travelled most on trains during the 1960s finishing in the early 70s, and then again for work in the mid 1980s, so our experiential eras just overlapped. I do vividly remember that change over period where 'modern' rolling stock started to appear and the rakes and rakes of sugar beat wagons, vans and other loose coupled stock laid up in nearly every siding in the country. Pick up freight wagons were still in operation in 1974 when I used to visit the local station in Newbridge and watch them uncoupling a single wagon from a goods train waiting in the loop while passenger trains past, and then roll it by man power into the goods shed for the local deliveries that day.

    The other issue for me was 'toy trains' in the 1960s were inevitably either British passenger steam trains or steam hauled loose coupled British goods wagons, so I grew up with the concept of shunting wagons, pick up freight, and lots of operations arranging train formations, steam engine run arounds, turn tables, at the end of each movement, all requiring lost of interesting track formations and lots of point switching, etc, so todays fixed formation push-pull DMU passenger trains that just go back and forth seem very limited to operate, and fixed rake freight formations less interesting to operate.

    I remember as a child getting a train set with two container flats and a few containers and 'spoiled brat' being secretly rather disappointed with the uniformity of a container train compared to a mixed goods train with vans, open wagons with all manner of loads, oil tankers, cable drums, steel flats, salt vans, grain wagons, coal, cattle, conflate, etc.

    As you say modernisation from 1974 onwards was swift and very interesting in its own new way. The sugar beat trains from my memory back then seemed the longest freight trains and most common.

    CIE Freight Modernisation

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Mayner View Post
    . . .

    In the 50s and 60s many people thought the change from steam to diesel and large scale line closures would kill the hobby, today Ireland's railways are probably in a better way than they ever were in terms of sheer intensity of service and the physical condition of rolling stock and infrastructure. Modelling a section of the contempory Cork or Belfast line would be more challenging than the 70s and 80s as apart from the 071 & 201 Class locos practically all the rolling stock would have to be custom built or built from scratch
    Thats very true John. From a modelling point of view many smaller stations no longer even have sidings only passing loops on single track lines, so operationally trains simply pass through or just stop for a few minutes. In relation to running 'contemporary' trains, in the old days one simply repainted UK model toys in Irish livery and childhood imaginations happily saw them as CIE. Standards have risen so as you say custom/scratch seems the only way to run a 22k back and forth like a yo-yo, but a 201 hauled mk4 set may seem more interesting even if it is just another form of yo-yo, but at least with a growling GM. We are blessed with good passenger model rolling stock from 60s, through to 90s, but a dream way back when a Hornby CIE liveried Hymek pulled BR Mk2a's in supertrain livery.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by minister_for_hardship View Post
    Doesn't stop them re-imagining the past. I very much doubt many that indulge in say, WW2 military modelling were knocking around back then.

    The present scene doesn't inspire me either. Neatly demarked car parks, soulless modern buildings and structures made as ugly as possible with indiscriminate use of galvanised steel barriers and palisade fencing. Little or no activity between trains to speak of.
    +1

    As you say progress doesn't stop the imagination modelling the past, whatever version of the past we remember.

  5. #25
    as apart from the 071 & 201 Class locos practically all the rolling stock would have to be custom built or built from
    At least they won't have to scratch build a lot of stock. !

  6. #26
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    I inhabit the parallel world, wherein lie gryphons, dwarves, changelings and railway enthusiasts.
    Posts
    5,507
    I always think accuracy of goods stock makes or breaks many a layout based in any era. Much is concentrated on locos and coaches, but all too frequently the goods stock is very much in the "repainted Hymek" league.

    Three is much information on here about the correct ways to depict non-passenger stock, and you've the likes of Provincial's (and others) wagons on sale now too. All good.

    Just avoid the black chassis and cream goods van balconies and ye are grand.....
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    I always think accuracy of goods stock makes or breaks many a layout based in any era. Much is concentrated on locos and coaches, but all too frequently the goods stock is very much in the "repainted Hymek" league.

    Three is much information on here about the correct ways to depict non-passenger stock, and you've the likes of Provincial's (and others) wagons on sale now too. All good.

    Just avoid the black chassis and cream goods van balconies and ye are grand.....
    I would hardly call my stock accurate, but I do agree having the proper stock gives a layout that edge.
    provincial wagons and SSM have brought up the standard a great degree
    Alas tis not easy being a teenage Irish railway modeller...
    Bigger is Better(But there are many exceptions!)


    Harry

  8. #28
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Texas Gulf Coast
    Posts
    2,242
    Moved this from Noel's paintshop thread where it was an aside
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    So, exceptions.....

    At least two, and possibly three, (fitted) "H" vans were standard carriage green with black chassis, for use as mail vans on Tralee-Mallow trains.
    Finally found one (that I had seen before and did't realize the significance of it at the time). 18829 in the light? green, black chassis, some letters under the number likely P&T and something else, illegible, Limerick, c. 1962. It's not mine to post unfortunately. As JHB said, he has photos to post in an upcoming book
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  9. #29
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    I inhabit the parallel world, wherein lie gryphons, dwarves, changelings and railway enthusiasts.
    Posts
    5,507
    Yes, Dive, it was the post-1955 green (as seen on A & C class locos, laminates, etc). The lettering below the number I am not sure about - but it may be something like "only to run between Mallow (or Cork?) and Tralee" or "7 tons" or something like that. The P&T logo or initials would probably be more likely to appear on an actual TPO.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,682
    Blog Entries
    24
    There is an undated photo of a light green H Van hiding behind Sambo at Inchacore Works in Irish Railways in Colour a Second Glance" Tom Ferris 1995. Standard un-fitted H Vans 19358 & 19613 are clearly visible in the background in all over mid grey scheme.

    As far as I recall the 1st batch of fitted H Vans were painted green to run in passenger trains. Apart from P&T some vans were allocated to specific traffic flows including Lamb Bros fruit traffic from Donabate to Amiens Street.
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Welcome to Irish Railway Modeller. The home of Railway Modelling and collecting in Ireland. We are a friendly, open community where you will find lots of support, advice and encouragement, as well as inspiration! Join us today!
Join us